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17 responses to “Venison Backstrap with Cumberland Sauce”

  1. Suburban Bushwacker

    Hank

    If port is not available, Sherry and Red wine seems to work as a substitute.

    Happy Crimbo to you and Holly
    SBW

  2. Ashley

    Thank you for reminding me of this classic sauce. Looks delicious. I bought my fiance your book for Christmas. Can’t wait to see his reaction. Thanks!

  3. Loretta Gartman

    This is definitely a recipe I will try — four deer in the freezer so far which isn’t bad for a someone who doesn’t hunt…but I try to cook for my hunter enough to keep him providing me with wild meats.

  4. Diana Lamon

    Looks fantastic.

  5. Tanngrisnir3

    I’m filing this right next to Steak Diane for older & classic (in this case, practically Classical) recipes that I need to try.

    Thanks for the great idea as always, H.

  6. Teala

    Hank, your blog has really inspired me. I finally made it out for my first duck hunt ever Sunday and came home with one pintail and one wood duck to this recipe in my inbox. It was a fantastic for dinner last night…pan roasted duck with cumberland sauce, creamy polenta and sauted rainbow chard. Delicously sweet and tangy! Moreover, a very rewarding accomplishment. But from your stories of communing with nature, respecting the earth and it’s creatures, delighting in it’s bounty…those things came to frution for me yesterday and I thank you.

  7. JB

    Hank – First time, long time here.

    Is that pilaf in the picture? What’s in that?

    JB

  8. Haldan Farm

    What about black currant jelly or syrup? I have dozens of jars of that, but no red currant.

  9. ricegrass

    Hank,
    I’m wondering if you have the recipe for the lovely looking side dish you have pictured with the venison on this page? It looks liked an upscale version of wild rice, but I’m not sure.

    Thanks!

  10. Albert Pollard

    Hank, I love all this (and am trying this tonight for a party I am invited too) but I think you should also include really basic, solid oven recipes as a base line so we can mix n match. Sort of a Blue Strawberry redux… congrats on the Beard Award, very impressive.

  11. Venison Loin With Cherry Cumberland Sauce And Goat Cheese « Putney Farm

    [...] for game and dried cherries). But we did find a good Venison with Cumberland Sauce recipe at Hunter, Angler, Gardener, Cook (if cooking with game the website to visit, IMHO) and decided to riff on [...]

  12. miss kate

    OMG!Excellent n easy. Hunterman said it was the best venison recipe he’s tasted. I’m a novice at game and have used this website with great success.

    I prepared Illinois whitetail backstrap loins. Used my large cast iron frypan. Browned them whole about 8-10 min total, after salting. I made the sauce using shallot,reduced beef broth and port. Served alongside steamed potatoes. Yummy!

    He’s excited to have leftovers.

  13. Jessie

    Loved this sauce, served it with venison roast for Xmas, and it was a hit. Thank you for this recipe, we have eaten venison forever, but this sauce brings it to a new level. Also, I love your Jenny Lind china.

  14. Kira

    I just finished eating this recipe with a few modifications, OMG, it was amazing! My husband is still raving about it. I didn’t have any shallots or currants or c-jelly, so substituted a little apricot jelly & some home made Christmas jelly, which had strawberry, blueberry & not sure what else in it as it was a gift & used regular onions. But it turned out awesome anyway. I did boil a few cranberries & used the chicken broth I had on hand. I also added generic Kitchen Bouquet. I used a little cooking sherry & some old cheap red wine that had already been opened, it didn’t matter. I think I just invented a red-neck version of your superb venison back-strap recipe. It was tender, so juicy & flavorful. YUM!! Thank you so much! BTW, this was my first time on your site, will definitely be back for more recipes.

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