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61 responses to “Duck Prosciutto”

  1. Lee Powell

    Hey Hank – love your site! I’m preparing to make your duck prosciutto recipe and curious a couple things:
    1) could you use deer tenderloin?
    2) if using duck – could you use wild? They are much smaller than domestic so could you use 2,4,6 of them together and if so how would you do this?

    Thanks much, Lee

  2. Giuseppe

    Hank…I’m going to try this tonight with some spec breasts. However, I have a similar issue to a lot of the other folks on here. I don’t have a humidifier! I have a room that stays about 45-60 this time of year but the humidity in the PNW this time of year is pretty low. Any ideas of how I can raise it in just this small room? I’ve heard of hanging a wet towel in the room, or would a cheap humidifier work?

    PS I tried your porcini/sage sausage recipe with elk, turned out excellent! Thanks for the cooking tips.

  3. DF

    When you say both halves of the breast, what do you mean?

  4. Ken

    Hank, I have enjoyed reading you blog(s), really good stuff. Now I’m full of questions.
    1. I would like to use frozen domestic duck breast, comments please.
    2. (In response to one of your readers)I too use a KA grinder, it works great and I have a vertical sausage tube that fits the grinder and is fine for my small operation.
    3. I have a wine cellar in my 170 yr. old stone farm house, The temp is 40 to 60 min/max degs. uncontrolled annually and humidity is controlled by a dehumidifier to approximately 60% adjustable down to 30%. If I let the humidity rise above 75% I incur mold and wood destroying fungi on the beams. Comments please on starting my cure at less than 85-90%.
    Thanks, Ken

  5. Andy

    Is there a way to cure in the refrigerator? The area I live in is either -30 outside or 65+ inside. And in the fridge would a pan of water underneath the duck help with humidity?

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