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14 responses to “Kentucky Burgoo”

  1. Matthew Mitchell

    Brunswick Stew is what we called it in NC growing up. Love this dish, harder to find outside the mid Atlantic region…kind of like Country Ham.

  2. Matt

    Have been making something similar to this for a couple of years. Guess it’s just ingrained in us Midwesterners. I got to throw in my two cents though. Don’t disregard the pressure cooker for cooking your game. You can cut the time to make this dish in half with out any loss of quality. Some times it can make the taste a little flat but a little vinegar / hot sauce or if the tomatoes aren’t sweet a little honey will round it out.

  3. Cheryl

    I am born,raised and still living in the beautiful state of Kentucky..
    Burgoo is a beautiful configuration of a stew/soup, use what’s on hand basically …my recipe is from the Kentucky Derby museum cook book “Dead Heat Burgoo”….fabulous recipe..look it up and add some cayenne to your recipe Hank!
    Love your recipes and so glad somebody out there puts hunting in a positive spin…my husband and I hunt deer, turkey, grouse and quail.
    Meat in the freezer and beautiful time spent outdoors enjoying the peacefulness of nature

  4. Chris

    Vacationing in Virginia this summer we had something strikingly similar to this but they called it Brunswick stew. According to wikipedia it has the same basic rules.

  5. rl reeves jr

    Great piece. Here’s an article I wrote about burgoo:

    Growing up in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky meant a steady diet of lots of creatures of the woods: Rabbit, Deer, Quail, Grouse maybe the occasional Groundhog…all fair game and often, depending on the preparation, delicious.

    One of the hallmarks of Kentucky cooking is Burgoo, a rich hunter’s stew chock full of game and whatever vegetables happen to be on hand at the time of the cookdown. and the recipe http://www.scrumptiouschef.com/food/index.cfm/2010/4/19/Slow-Difficult-Recipes-Part-2-Authentic-Kentucky-Burgoo-Recipe

  6. Art Lander Jr.

    Hank, thanks for the Burgoo recipe. I will keep it with my others. For many Kentuckians burgoo is a way of life, for family, friends, even political gatherings. Keeneland Race Course in Lexington has the best “store bought” burgoo in my opinion, but the wild game recipes are probably closer to the original frontier burgoo

  7. Beverly Firme

    Hank:

    I can’t wait to try your recipe for Kentucky Burgoo, and this actually reminds me alot of Bigos, known in Poland as Hunter’s Stew. Bigos does not have beans or corn, but everything else is very similar to your Burgoo recipe. Traditionally Hunter’s Stew was made in Poland with whatever was caught that day on a hunting trip. Bigos also always contains 3-4 types of meats including pheasant, boar, and of course sausage. There is also potato, onion, pepper, red wine and some type of tomato as well. When I first made Bigos when I lived in Chicago I was told that nowadays this is made as a final ‘hot course’ for a party that’s going late into the night in the winter, but for a hunting party it was always made as hunters returned from their hunting, gradually adding their contribution to a pot already cooking over an open fire and then served later in the evening.

  8. Sarah G

    Sounds just like the Brunswick Stew I had in Macon, GA. The thought of squirrel just makes me a big squeamish. I have made it with chicken as the base. Perhaps I should use up my pheasant (that has spent too much time in the freezer) for something like this.

  9. Mike Dwyer

    I second Art’s comments…Keenland has some great burgoo. I haven’t tried to make it in years. I keep saying I am going to do some with some squirrels but I keep coming back to your cassoulet recipe.

  10. will

    In Minnesota and Wisconsin we have an almost identical stew served at fundraisers and church basements called booyah. Everyone has their own “authentic” recipe.

  11. Mike D

    Great recipe! I know it is cheating a bit, but I use a pressure cooker and use wild turkey legs, squirrels and tougher cuts of deer and cook them separately. I save the water which is essentially stock for the rest of the recipe and insures that the meat is tender. It saves a bit of time as well! So glad Burgoo is getting a little pub. Eating it all my life and have taken it with me to Illinois from KY and break it out when I want to feed all my hunting buds and their wives.

  12. dan

    I am looking forward to trying this. Moose,ptarmigan and snowshoe hare for meat.
    Hope you keep posting

    Dan

  13. Max

    My kind of food! I’ll be making this for the super bowl. Thanks for the recipe.

  14. Jon

    Great recipe. I didn’t have any squirrel. Used venison, snow goose, and pheasant legs. It was great! Made it for a potluck. Some turned up their noses, it smells so delightful that they came back for ‘a small taste’ and then I had ‘em.

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