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21 responses to “Berries of the Coastal Range”

  1. Jessa

    We have an awesome huckleberry spot out in the Bay Area where they are fully ripe and are BOOMING this year – last week we picked a gallon in about an hour – I dried some, made some huckle-fig preserves (delicious!), and froze a bunch for sourdough-huckleberry pancakes.

    We’re going up again in a few days for another haul.

  2. Lang

    The evergreen huck (V. ovatum) is the last of the huckleberries to ripen in my region and is often available as late as Thanksgiving for making a holiday pie. Have you tried the Sierras for mountain hucks–they should be ripe now. Good call on the salal, it’s a plant to know, especially because here in the PacNW chanterelles like to hide underneath the foliage!

  3. Sarah Galvin (All Our Fingers in the Pie)

    I have yet to taste huckleberries. They also grow in British Columbia and are a favourite out there, as saskatoon berries are here, on the prairies.

  4. Carol

    Hank, maybe you know this already, but salal branches (sans berries) are widely used by florists as a green accent/filler in bouquets. Check it out the next time you buy Holly flowers!

  5. Perry

    Nice haul! Remember where your huckleberry patches are, in winter you will probably find black chanterelles under them. Craterellus cornucopoides seem to have a mycorrhizal association with thim in the North Bay, especially in the coastal range.

  6. deana@lostpastremembered

    Nope, another berry that I’ve never heard of!! WOnderful! I also like the mini pie idea. Perfect for those end of season yields… little mini pies. They are not wasteful and you don’t feel like a great pig eating the whole thing!!

  7. Nate @ House of Annie

    Very pretty berry! Do you use the entire berry off the stem, or peel off the “petals”?

  8. Jen

    Wow, just saw this post today.

    Salal and huckleberries were favourite hiking berries growing up. They’re both extremely easy to find on Vancouver Island and you can usually find a patch or two befor ethe bears get them.

    Out of curiousity – you picked blue huckleberries, do you have red as well? Reds grow almost everywhere back home, but I’ve only ever seen the blue at higher altitudes.

  9. Rosie Redfield

    The berries that you’re calling huckleberries would be called blueberries in British Columbia. We save ‘huckleberry’ for their red relative (Vaccinium parvifolium, I think).

    Salal berries are easy to find and quite palatable, but they’re not very flavourful. In fact they’re downright insipid (some sugar, no acid, just a generic ‘red/blue’ flavour).

  10. Bay Area Foraging with Hank Shaw

    […] Blackberries are a good one. Everyone knows what they look like, and they are everywhere. Put on some gloves and get out there in July and August. We also have great huckleberry picking around here. Huckleberries are a lot like blueberries, only a little spicier, a little more tart. There are other berries around, too. […]

  11. Harry McNicholasl

    Picked huckleberries, blackcaps, naitve blackberries, thimbleberries, wild strawberries and currants for years in Oregon. Salals are also good especially dried. I think the berries on the coast and the Sierrras is a different kind than the ones in the Cascades.

  12. Salal Berries | Roots & Marvel

    […] recipes: • Berries of the Coastal Range (Hunter Angler Gardener Cook) • Salal Berry Jam (Seattle […]

  13. mark

    Hank,

    I have lived in the Bay Area most of my life. Where did you find the huckleberries? I have found them growing abundantly in Oregon, but have never come across them in California.

  14. Another Amy

    Ok, so I am really glad your friend Amy knew about where to find these, but I am in the bay area, and am looking for them as well… Please direct me where to go! They cost $45 for 3 pounds if you buy them from Montana sellers- which you know I believe in supporting small businesses, but not with half my check! :D (Ok, exaggerating…) Still, where can I go? Do they grow in forests? Beach areas? What? Thanks bunches!

    Amy from Livermore, CA

  15. Bay Area Foraging with Hank Shaw

    […] Blackberries are a good one. Everyone knows what they look like, and they are everywhere. Put on some gloves and get out there in July and August. We also have great huckleberry picking around here. Huckleberries are a lot like blueberries, only a little spicier, a little more tart. There are other berries around, too. […]

  16. Abadi

    Lang – I live in the Sacramento valley, usually take a hike at the Sierra mtns. usually spot black berry bushes with no berries. however never spotted hucks.

  17. richard

    Is there such a thing as a wild berry picking map for northern california?

  18. Rawr

    Um, I just ate a heap of Salal berries in Oregon and they have a very fragrant flavor. The first taste is weaker than a Blueberry BUT the after flavor is a lot stronger than Blueberries. Over all they were hands down more flavorful than Blueberries, and I self pick those… So I’m a bit experienced.

    I was curious about more information on them, particular anti-oxidant comp. and was surprised some people were saying they weren’t flavorful!

  19. Candy

    Thank you so much for helping the kids and I properly identify the salal berries growing right down the road from us. We are going back for some more. Your article and pictures are a great resource!

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