steak au poivre recipe
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5 from 1 vote

Steak au Poivre

As I mentioned, you can use really any steak with this. I prefer it with venison (of any kind) or waterfowl, specklebelly geese especially. But regular beef steak is great, too, especially filet mignon, ribeye, New York strip, etc. This is also excellent with lamb chops. I really prefer to use a good glace de viande or demi-glace for this recipe, as it moves things along faster and adds a lot of body to the sauce. I've linked to my recipe for duck glace, and you can buy demi-glace in fine supermarkets or online. But don't let this stop you from making the recipe: I've also used low-sodium beef stock and boiled it down and it works, too.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time50 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: French
Servings: 4 people
Author: Hank Shaw

Ingredients

  • 4 steaks (dusk breasts, small goose breasts, venison, elk, bison, beef, etc)
  • Salt
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter , divided
  • 1/4 cup minced shallot
  • 1/4 cup duck glace de viande, or 1/2 cup duck or beef stock
  • 1 tablespoon roughly cracked black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon green peppercorns
  • 1/3 cup brandy
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream

Instructions

  • Take the steaks out and salt them well. If you are cooking goose breasts, let them sit out a solid 30 to 45 minutes. Generally, the thinner the steak the shorter the time it needs to come to temperature. And if you make this with streaks 1/4 inch or thinner, take them right out of the fridge and into the hot pan.
  • Heat 2 tablespoons of butter in a large saute pan set over medium-high heat. When the butter is hot, pat the steaks dry with paper towels and lay them in the pan so they don't touch each other. Sear them, turning only once, until they are done to your liking, using the finger test for doneness. If you are using duck or goose breasts, follow my instructions for cooking a duck breast here. Put the steaks on a cutting board to rest while you make the sauce.
  • Make sure you have only about 2 to 3 tablespoons of fat in the pan; if you've cooked duck or goose breasts you will need to remove some. Add the shallot and saute until it begins to brown, about 2 minutes. Add the glace de viande or stock and the peppercorns and bring to a boil. Boil this down by half if you are using stock -- you need not do this with the glace, as it is already reduced.
  • Add the brandy, bring it to a boil and let this boil furiously until you can drag a wooden spoon through the center of the pan and watch it leave a trail. This typically takes about 2 to 4 minutes. Turn off the heat and mix in the cream. When the sauce stops bubbling, add the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter one tablespoon at a time, swirling each tablespoon in to incorporate it. Doing this should prevent the butter from separating. Serve either over or under your steaks.