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11 responses to “Wild Boar Chile Verde”

  1. Queso

    I once had dinner at Mariquita farm in Watsonville. The farmer told us that a few of his workers recommended a certain tomatillo varietal that was smaller but impossible to find in stores here. He started planting it for his workers. Probably a similar tomatillo you got there I’d imagine.

  2. Ryan

    There are also tomatillos de milpa that are used when purple and of a similar smaller size. Lamb or mutton are nice in a verde as well.
    http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=1413(OG)

  3. J.R. Young

    I planted “regular” tomatillos and purple tomatillos this year. I was able to get starters from Mountain Feed and Farm Supply in Ben Lomond (a must visit if you’re over this way). I had never heard of purple tomatillos before so I figured I had to try.

  4. Susan 30A EATS

    Learn something new everyday. That is why I subscribe to your blog. Seriously, only subscribe to two, and I’m a foodie/blogger! ;)

  5. Kevin

    There are a few species here in the southeast that love to show up on disturbed ground (Gardens!). Apparently the old timers used to make “ground-cherry pies” out of them(not sure if sweetened or savory like a tomato pie) but not anymore it seems.

  6. deana

    I planted tomatillos once in my old garden in upstate NY. They came back for years afterward and I loved them. I never got them to purple but they seemed ripe when they were bursting out of their no longer green husks and pale yellow. Not only are they delicious but they are so darn good for you!

    Delicious recipe. I can’t wait to try it.

  7. Jan Brandt

    I want to try this using pork. What cut do you recommend. I would imagine that pork shoulder has more fat than the boar. I have never used boar, just wondering. New to your blog…I like it!

  8. Brent

    The photo of the dish made it look so yummy, I just had to try it. Trying to use what I already had on hand, I made several adjustments.

    -I used 5 roasted Hatch green chillies and two roasted jalapenos instead of reccomended
    – 2 lbs of cubed venison from my deer this season instead of pork
    – Doubled the ammount of reccomended stock

    It turned out great, everyone loved it. It may have been a tad spicy for some people though (not me). When I make it again, I think I will add more tomatillos! Thanks for the great recipe!

    -Brent

  9. Brent

    Forgot to add that I served it on cilantro lime rice (Like whats served at Chipoltle :o ) and put crumbled “queso fresco” on top.

  10. octopod

    To clear up the botanical confusion a little bit:

    When we talk about “tomatillos”, “ground cherries”, and “Peruvian cherries”, we’re dealing with three different species of the genus Physalis. “True” tomatillos grow on a plant that is bushy like a potato or tomato plant, are savory-sour as described here, green or purple, and walnut-to plum-sized. The ground cherry that Kevin’s talking about is (I think) a low, sprawling plant native to the southern U.S. whose fruit are very sweet, bright yellow-orange, and blueberry-sized, with a distinctive flavor — kind of like a banana, a strawberry, and a tomato, all at once. And then there’s a South American variety that’s got a growth habit more like the tomatillo, with fruit that are on the large side of cherry-sized, light yellow, sweet, and don’t have quite as much of the strong ground-cherry taste but it’s still there.

    As far as I can tell from growing all of these, they hybridize freely, and with varying culinary value. We got a hybrid between the Inca cherry and the tomatillo this year that was downright yucky — almost white, with hardly any sourness or sweetness at all.

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